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Posted at: Feb 14, 2018, 1:31 AM; last updated: Feb 14, 2018, 1:31 AM (IST)NO DETENTION POLICY

Time to review policy: Experts

Say students have no fear of failing in exams as they know they will pass in any case

What it says

  • The 300th report on RTE (second Amendment) Bill, 2017, was tabled in both houses of the Parliament last year, which empowered the state/UT government to either retain a child in Class V and VIII, or either of them, or not to hold any child in any class. The proposed amendment was referred to the parliamentary standing committee on Human Resource Development for review.
  • Section 16 of the RTE Act stipulates that 'No child admitted to a school shall be held back in any class or expelled from school till the completion of elementary education'. The policy covers elementary stage of schooling covering classes 1 to 8.

Tribune News Service

Ludhiana, February 13

With the standing committee on Human Resource Development revisiting the ‘no detention policy’ under the Right to Education (RTE) Act, educationists in the city also believe it is time to root out the retention policy from the education system.

Kusum Lata, Principal of Government High School, Sarabha Nagar, while opposing the NDP policy said: “The policy is flawed in its true sense. Some filtration is required so that qualitative education is sustained. Students have no fear of failing in exams. Many children do not come to school or study throughout the year because they know that they will pass in any case. With such measure, the dropout rate is bound to increase in Class IX, when such students fail. Nevertheless, it is the duty of the teacher as well to ensure minimal dropout.”

“It is a bad policy. Ours is a funded literacy system, where we want to prove literacy on papers by showing numbers. But in reality, there is less emphasis on quality. The dentition should be allowed from Class V onwards,” said a primary government teacher requesting anonymity. “Teachers are reprimanded on account of poor results, but how will the results improve if we keep promoting students to the next class?” she asked.

Harmeet Kaur Waraich, Principal of Nankana Public School, contended that the Punjab Government has been taking notes from the RTE Act in portions. She said: “No-detention policy is a norm of the RTE. The Punjab Government has not implemented RTE so far and if it has not implemented the Act, why are we considering RTE in parts?”

However, some educationists are of an opinion that the ‘no-detention policy’ does no harm to students. DP Guleria, Principal of BCM, Sec 32, said: “There is no harm in retaining the child up to Class V because till then there is a scope of improvement for students in primary education. To build a strong base for students, the policy should be worked out till Class VIII.”


"There is no harm in retaining the child up to Class V because till then there is a scope of improvement for students in primary education. To build a strong base for students, the policy should be worked out till Class VIII" — DP Guleria, Principal of BCM, Sec 32

"The policy is flawed in its true sense. Some filtration is required so that qualitative education is sustained. Students have no fear of failing in exams. Many children do not come to school or study throughout the year because they know that they will pass in any case. With such measure, the dropout rate is bound to increase in Class IX, when such students fail." — Kusum Lata, Principal, Government High School, Sarabha Nagar

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